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Charity social media benchmarking survey

In partnership with GOSS Interactive, Aspire Knowledge has conducted a survey of charities to benchmark social media and digital communications usage.

Download your copy of the survey report now

Charity use of social media benchmark survey full results

The survey is an important benchmark for charities to understand current trends in digital communication and social media. Additionally not for profits can use the insight for a variety of purposes including creating a business case and align to best practice.

Rob McCarthy, CEO, GOSS Interactive, "GOSS are delighted to be involved in this benchmarking survey with Aspire Knowledge. The findings will be invaluable for organisations who wish to compare their digital communications and social media activity with others in the industry. It has highlighted some fascination insights and will, I am sure, generate much debate in the community."

Social Media

It is good to see that most charities are embracing some social media activity, however only 52% report that they are monitoring the effectiveness of social media engagement. Whilst monitoring social media engagement can be difficult, by not doing so it is impossible for an organisation to understand if it is meeting its objectives.

Rob McCarthy, CEO, GOSS Interactive, "Measuring the effectiveness of your digital strategy and social media activity is vital to understand how users engage with your website and to improve customer journeys. Above all it can help prove the success and importance of online marketing."

Creating efficiencies - do it online

Delivering services and collecting donations online is the most efficient way of engaging with service users and supporters, as acknowledged by 74% of those surveyed. This makes it even more staggering that 57% of responders collect less than 5% of their donations online although 65% said that they wanted to collect more via their website. Added to this, 49% were under pressure to reduce costs. There seems a clear route to resolving the requirement to reduce costs, increase online donations and make efficiency savings - put a strategy and budget in place to facilitate the collection of more donations online.

Rob McCarthy, CEO, GOSS Interactive, "We have been involved in helping numerous businesses and organisations, who recognise the efficiency gains that can be made online, move and improve their operations and services on a digital platform. By doing this, website visitors have a better experience while website owners reduce their costs and improve service delivery. Which business would not want happier customers, an improved service and a lower cost base?"

Other surveys (SOCITM channel benchmarking) have indicated that channel costs are:

  • £8.23 Face-to-face
  • £3.21 Telephone
  • £0.39 Website

For service provision, beatbullying published at the Third Sector Digital Communication and Social Media convention the costs for 1-2-1 interventions:

  • £600 Face-to-face
  • £250 Telephone
  • £60 Online

The results from the Aspire Knowledge/GOSS Interactive survey indicate understanding that "do it online" is efficient, but little progress is being made putting this into practice.

Charity donations collected via websites chart

52% of those who responded said that their biggest challenge to online fundraising is budget.

49% said that they were under pressure to reduce costs.

74% believe delivering services online is efficient.

Yet over 50% said that they are collecting less than 5% of their donations online.

If you are going to change one thing with your digital communications, enable "do it online".

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